Copy that Increases Sharing on Social Media

OPR
OPR
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President of OPR Communications in Riverside, California, Patrick O’Reilly possesses more than two decades of public relations experience. Patrick O’Reilly and his Riverside team deliver numerous services, including copywriting.

Copywriting is among the most important pieces to creating and delivering sound content. In terms social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, quality content not only engages a person to follow a company, but it also encourages them to take action, thus converting a fan into a customer.

To increase conversion rates, a company should craft messages that persuade people to share. Copy must include a unique selling proposition (USP) that helps a business or product stand out from competitors. A USP should be concise and summed up in a single sentence that is clearly understood by targeted audiences.

Likewise, effective copy that promotes sharing uses PAS, which stands for “problem, agitate, and solution.” Copy that identifies a problem and explains how it impacts a person, and then follows it up with a resolution is more likely to go viral. Using strong action verbs and incorporating a cliffhanger element also can increase sharing.

Elements of Good Speeches

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OPR
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Riverside, California-area resident Patrick O’Reilly has over a decade of experience in public relations. Steering strategic communication campaigns in the western United States, Patrick O’Reilly’s Riverside company OPR Communications offers its clients a wide variety of communication assistance, including speech writing services.

Effective speeches are written with meticulous care. A methodical approach to speech writing will involve awareness of:

1. Your audience. Before writing a speech, ensure you understand the audience, their needs, expectations, and attitudes. Find out what they already know and do not know, their attitude toward the speaker, and any prevailing interests they may have.

2. The core message. Focus your speech on the core message of interest to the audience. Make it simple and understandable. Too little substance spurs disinterest, while too many ideas will have the audience confused about your priorities.

3. Structure. Start by setting the expectation and identifying a path, and follow it through to the destination. Do not include extraneous, irrelevant, or contradictory information.

4. The opening. Grab the audience’s attention from the beginning. Ask a question or share a startling statistic or humorous short story. Start with momentum and capitalize on it to the end.

PR Week Polls Global PR Leaders on Preferred News Sources

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OPR
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Riverside, California, business leader Patrick O’Reilly has more than a decade of experience in public relations and crisis management. From headquarters in Riverside, Patrick O’Reilly and OPR Communications serve organizations throughout the western United States. OPR has garnered numerous accolades from PR industry organizations, including PR Week’s award for PR Campaign of the Year.

In addition to recognizing national public relations leaders, PR Week tracks trends in the PR sector. Each year, the public relations resource compiles and publishes its Global Power Book, which not only highlights leading figures in PR but also provides PR Week with an opportunity to learn about best practices in the industry. In a recent article, PR Week unveiled the results of a Global Power Book questionnaire that sought to discover, among other things, how industry figures consume their news.

The poll found that the vast majority of participants choose Twitter for breaking news. However, when asked to list which news source they considered the most influential, respondents favored established publications like the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. The selection of newspapers included some 50 publications, suggesting that while traditional media sources may still be the most influential, there is not an obvious leader among them.